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Health & Safety

Health & Wellness

When and How to Take Your Child's Temperature

Children aren’t always able to tell you what’s wrong when they aren’t feeling well and might be sick. One sign that they might be sick is when their body temperature is higher or lower than normal - but what’s normal? When should you take your child’s temperature and how should you take it? A normal body temperature under your child’s armpit (axilla) is between 36.5°C to 37.5°C. When your child’s body is trying to fight off an illness or infection, their temperature can rise higher than 37.5°C. This is called a fever.


A Look at Postpartum Anxiety

Ask a new mom about her actions after giving birth, and you’ll hear a range of behaviors that would probably sound odd to most non-moms: Watching the baby’s breathing, checking the baby monitor dozens of times, keeping an eye on the front door for potential intruders. To new moms, these actions are likely all too familiar. The anxiety that comes with motherhood is something many new moms feel but rarely discuss. And perinatal anxiety - that is, anxiety during pregnancy and the postpartum period - has received limited attention from researchers and health professionals, according to a 2017 review article in The British Journal of Psychiatry, despite the fact that it is highly prevalent. We are, after all, suddenly responsible for tiny, helpless, precious humans. Who wouldn’t be anxious? This can all lead a mom to wonder, How much anxiety is too much?


Food Allergies at Sleep-Away Camp

Sleep-away camp is a right of passage for many children today, but deciding when and if to send your child on this journey is difficult. For parents of children with food allergies, the concerns of sending your child to camp become even greater. Navigating the world with a food allergy is often tricky, yet having the same experiences that non-allergic children have is not only important, it is entirely possible.


Are We Addicted to Cell Phones?

How much time did your kids spend on their cell phones yesterday? When was the last time you checked your cell phone? If contemplating these questions makes you uncomfortable, you’re not alone. Cell phones dominate our lives in part because they are designed to do precisely that, according to Tristran Harris, a tech entrepreneur who worked as a Product Ethicist at Google. Now he runs TimeWellSpent, a non-profit that points out how cell phones and their apps hijack our attention. The group urges tech designers to take the equivalent of the Hippocratic Oath and encourages consumers to make more mindful decisions about when, how, and where to use their phones.


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